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The Future of Breast Cancer Surgery Is Here

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: M. Michele Blackwood, MD, FACS From: onclive.com Thanks to advances in research, targeted therapies, and a more personalized approach to treating patients diagnosed with breast cancer, more surgical options exist for patients with breast cancer patients than ever before. Thanks to advances in research, targeted therapies, and a more personalized approach to treating patients diagnosed with breast cancer, more …

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How Targeted Therapies Are Changing the Breast Cancer Treatment Landscape

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Jessica Skarzynski From: curetoday.com Targeted therapies that attack cancer in a more precise way than traditional chemotherapy are being used more in the field of breast cancer, but the solution in utilizing them lies within the patient-oncologist relationship, according to Dr. Dejan Juric. Juric, who is the director of the Termeer Center for Targeted Therapies at Massachusetts General Hospital …

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Assessing the Changing Treatment Landscape in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From: onclive.com Treatment options for triple-negative breast cancer are historically limited; however, recent developments regarding the use of targeted therapies and various combination regimens have broadened the treatment spectrum and ushered in new clinical approaches. Triple-negative, basal-like breast cancers are historically more invasive subtypes of breast cancer.1 The difficulty of discovering triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) through a mammogram coupled with …

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Expert Highlights Precision Medicine in Breast Cancer During Breast Cancer Awareness Month

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Danielle Ternyila From: targetedonc.com Most patients with breast cancer are curable, according to Hannah Linden, MD, and by identifying patients with mutations, targeted therapies can be used to help improve outcomes and survival in many patients. “We are doing better for helping women with breast cancer, and it’s a more treatable disease,” said Linden. “Imaging, liquid biopsy, and molecular …

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The Problem With Miracle Cancer Cures

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Robert M. Wachter From: nytimes.com I FREQUENTLY care for patients with advanced cancer. A majority have already tried some combination of surgery, chemotherapy and radiation. Many have landed back in the hospital because the cancer has returned or spread widely and left them in intractable pain or struggling to breathe. The hospital stay is often a time when patients …

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Cancer Therapy: An Evolved Approach – Scientific American

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Cassandra Willyard From: scientificamerican.com About six years ago, Alberto Bardelli fell into a scientific slump. A cancer biologist at the University of Turin in Italy, he had been studying targeted therapies—drugs tailored to the mutations that drive the growth of a tumour. The strategy seemed promising, and some patients started to make dazzling recoveries. But then, inevitably, their tumours …

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‘Hundreds of cancer drugs’ to enter market in next five years: report

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Jane Lee From: smh.com.au Businessman Ron Walker considers himself among the luckiest cancer survivors. Not only was he accepted into the first clinical trial of a drug that had the potential to cure his melanoma, he could also afford the cost of both flying to the United States to participate, and the drug itself – a whopping $120,000 a year. What’s more, the drug, which …

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New cancer drugs raise hope for patients, but carry steep costs

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Steve Buist From: thestar.com A coin flip saved Steve Rudaniecki’s life. Three years ago, he was down to his final months and out of treatment options after a 10-year fight with late-stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Then Rudaniecki was offered a Hail Mary — a spot in a clinical trial at Hamilton’s Juravinski Cancer Centre. Even though his swollen lymph …