Slip, slop, slap, success: Skin cancer rates plummet thanks to long-running nationwide sun safety campaign

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

The slip, slop, slap message is proving to be effective with melanoma rates plummeting in the past 18 years. A long-term study of teenagers and young adults has revealed the cases of melanoma in young people fell 5 per cent each year from the mid-1990s to 2010. Research leader Adele Green said it showed the effectiveness of sun safety message. …

Aspirin Every Other Day May Lower Women’s Colon Cancer Risk

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From Drugs.com Taking a low-dose aspirin every other day may reduce the risk of colorectal cancer, according to a study that focused on nearly 40,000 women aged 45 and older. The protection does seem to take some time to surface, said researcher Nancy Cook, a professor of medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School. “After 10 years, …

Oregon Woman Tans Her Way to a Melanoma Diagnosis

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From Drugs.com Katie Wilkes was just 23 years old when she noticed a strange spot on her right breast. “It was darker than many of my other freckles or moles — not quite black, but it was dark,” said Wilkes, who lives in Portland, Ore. “I asked my boyfriend at the time if I should have it removed. He told …

Lessons from a diagnosis of skin cancer

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

by J. Leonard Lichtenfeld I have been diagnosed with skin cancer. There really isn’t much special about that, since it is a distinction I share with over 2 million Americans who have a skin cancer removed every year. Fortunately, for most, it is a cancer that is not of particular concern since most can be removed. But even those “simple” …

New Drug May Help Immune System Fight Cancer

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

An experimental drug that taps the power of the body’s immune system to fight cancer is shrinking tumors in patients for whom other treatments have failed, an early study shows. The drug binds to a protein called PD-L1 that sits on the surface of cancer cells and makes them invisible to the immune system, almost like a cloaking device. “That …