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Discovery of protein’s role in cell migration may improve understanding of how breast cancer spreads

In Clinical Studies News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Adrianna MacPherson, University of Alberta From: medicalxpress.com A team of University of Alberta researchers has identified an unexpected role for a protein known as BAD in the ability of cells to migrate in the body—a finding that has promising implications for understanding how breast cancer spreads. BAD, short for “BCL2 associated agonist of cell death,” has many roles in …

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New drug could help in breast cancer fight, Scottish research finds

In Clinical Studies News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Craig Cairns From: thenational.scot A PROTEIN which helps breast cancer tumours survive could be targeted with a new type of drug that is already being tested for other cancers, research suggests The protein, known as MCL-1, helps breast cancer cells survive by hindering their natural ability to die. This process, called apoptosis, is the body’s way of getting rid …

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Protein causes mutations that lead to breast cancer cell aggression

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

Source: University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry From: eurekalert.org Like most scientists, University of Alberta biochemist Ing Swie Goping is curious. When her team discovered that a protein was associated with poor outcomes in breast cancer patients, she wanted to know why. Now, that curiosity has led to the discovery of a new mechanism for how certain breast …

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Novel Treatment Causes Cancer to Self-Destruct Without Affecting Healthy Cells

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

Source: Albert Einstein College of Medicine From: PR Newswire Scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine have discovered the first compound that directly makes cancer cells commit suicide while sparing healthy cells. The new treatment approach, described in today’s issue of Cancer Cell, was directed against acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells but may also have potential for attacking other types …

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Experimental drug may become key tool to target triple-negative breast cancer with immunotherapy

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

Source: University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus From: news-medical.net Previous studies at the University of Colorado Cancer Center show that the experimental drug AMPI-109 potently kills triple-negative breast cancer cells. But even the most compelling evidence of cell death in a dish isn’t enough to push a drug into human clinical trials, even for triple-negative breast cancer, which has a …

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Why cancer is so hard to beat

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From: Taylor & Francis Group, an Informa business A new study published in Biotechnology & Biotechnological Equipment may have identified one of the key reasons why cancer is so hard to beat; it’s an evolutionary mechanism to protect the survival of life on Earth. As authors Rumena Petkova and Stoyan Chakarov explain, our bodies are usually very efficient at identifying …

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Probing the mystery of how cancer cells die

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Charlotte Hsu From: grad.buffalo.edu Study traces how enigmatic molecules — said to be named for the riddle-telling sphinx — help cancer self-destruct You’ve probably never heard of “sphingolipids” before. But these curiously named organic compounds play a vital role in one of humanity’s most well-known diseases: cancer. Sphingolipids are a type of organic molecule found inside the body. Their …

Researchers discover a way to halt cancer: now that’s metal!

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By Nikhilesh De From: dailytargum.com Halting cancer may soon be as simple as swallowing a pill or getting an injection, said David Kimball, associate vice president of the Office of Translational Sciences. Researchers at the Cancer Institute of New Jersey recently discovered that a protein known as p53 was responsible for many forms of solid-tumor cancers, including pancreatic, breast, ovarian …