Namibia: Turkish Embassy Equips Cancer Ward

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From: allafrica.com

The Turkish Embassy through the Turkish International Cooperation and Coordination Agency on Friday handed medical equipment to the Windhoek Central Hospital’s children cancer ward.

The equipment included cardio respiratory monitors, a blood pressure monitoring machine, mobile examination light and a diagnostic set.

The Ambassador of Turkey to Namibia, Deniz Cakar, formally handed over the equipment to the ward through the Ministry of Health and Social Services.

She said not so long ago, she paid a courtesy visit to the hospital ward and promised to come back with some aid.

Cakar also noted at that occasion that childhood cancer has risen over the past few decades.

“The disease is more common now than it was before,” said Cakar. She added cancer kills more children than any other disease in the developed world.

“But while the number of new cases of childhood cancer has risen the death rate has decreased for most forms since 1970, largely because of improved treatment,” said Cakar who presented the medical equipment to the children cancer ward on Friday.

In her remarks, the Deputy Minister of Health and Social Services, Petrina Haingura, who accepted the medical equipment on behalf of the ministry expressed gratitude for the donation.

She said the Turkish Embassy responded speedily to their requests on the wish list presented by the health personnel.

“I appreciate the speed. We acknowledge and appreciate the gesture,” stated Haingura.

She said the burden on government to meet the health needs of the public is enormous.

Hence, the need for other stakeholders to come on board. “The burden on government is big. The ministry (of Health and Social Services) alone can’t achieve what it wants to achieve,” said Haingura.

Furthermore, she told the health personnel who will be working directly with the equipment to put it to good use. “The equipment should not gather dust. They should be put to good use,” urged Haingura.