High Doses of Common Painkillers May Raise Risk for Heart Trouble

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From Drugs.com People who take high doses of common painkillers known as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) face a greater risk for heart problems, a new analysis shows. Although NSAIDs are used around the world to help people with inflammatory conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, a review of nearly 650 randomized trials found that taking either 2,400 milligrams (mg) of ibuprofen …

Get healthy for a better night’s sleep

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

by WRIGHT, JASON ASHLEY Kendra Wright-Smith is an insomniac. “I’ve battled it since college,” she said. Usually, it lasts three to four days, occasionally five. “I have to have someone drive me to work when it happens,” she said. “It’s too dangerous to drive tired.” At one point when she was so sleep-deprived, Smith caught herself once having a conversation …

Kids Poisoned by Medical Marijuana, Study Finds

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

Legalizing marijuana may have unintended consequences. Since medical marijuana was legalized in Colorado, more than a dozen young children have been unintentionally poisoned with the drug, researchers report. About half the cases resulted from kids eating marijuana-laced cookies, brownies, sodas or candy. In many cases, the marijuana came from their grandparents’ stash, the investigators said. “We are seeing increases in …

Doctor/patient communication: Who’s doing the talking?

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

by ANDREW M. SEAMAN NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – There’s room – and need – for improvement in the discussions between doctor and patient that go into medical decision-making, according to research out on Monday. In four studies and a commentary published in JAMA Internal Medicine, the authors look at various aspects of doctors’ dialogue with patients about prognoses, options …

Details vary, but story the same for most domestic violence victims

In In The News, Uncategorized by Barbara Jacoby

From the thetimes-tribune.com By Katie Sullivan (Staff Writer) Danielle’s face was gone. Authorities identified her body by the rose tattoo on her ankle and the personalized gold necklace with her name on it they found next to her body. Danielle Gangemi’s live-in boyfriend beat her, then shot her in the head with a 12-gauge shotgun before killing himself. Danielle’s mother, …

Prominent Research Physician Points to Cures As Key to Holding down Medical Costs

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

WESTFIELD, N.J., May 23, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Stephen L. DeFelice , M.D., Founder and Chairman of FIM, The Foundation for Innovation in Medicine, released a new video criticizing mainstream health care cost projections of Medicare, Medicaid and Obamacare, among others, because they omit the discovery of cures.  He cites a boom in technology, including gene modification and new organ growth …

New urine-based test to detect breast cancer

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From Zee News Washington: Scientists have developed a new urine-based screening method to diagnose breast cancer and determine its severity even before it can be detected with a mammogram. A Missouri University of Science and Technology researcher used a device called a P-scan, to detect the concentration of certain metabolites called pteredines in urine samples. These biomarkers are present in …

Overcoming Perfectionism: Finding The Key To Balance & Self-Acceptance

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

Chicago, IL, May 24, 2013 – Anything worth doing is worth doing well. Practice makes perfect. Winning isn’t everything, it’s the only thing. Failure is not an option. In today’s perfection-obsessed culture, these are the maxims we live by. Yet, the damage that they cause is stifling. Renowned author and pioneer of codependency treatment Ann W. Smith knows this first …

10 Reasons Why Your Doctor Won’t See Medicare Patients

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From managemypractice.com Many patients are panicked that their physician will stop seeing Medicare patients, and that is not without cause. Physicians that care for Medicare patients do so at a loss to their practice which they can only hope to make up for from other payers. As money gets tighter and tighter, physicians are forced to decide if they can …