Herbal Meds, Cosmetic Surgery a Bad Mix: Experts

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From Drugs.com About half of patients take herbal and other supplements before undergoing cosmetic facial plastic surgery, according to a new study. Many of these supplements can put patients at risk during surgery and they should stop taking them at least two weeks before their procedure, Dr. Bahman Guyuron and colleagues at Case Western Reserve University advised. The investigators examined …

New hope for hormone resistant breast cancer

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From: medicalxpress.com A new finding provides fresh hope for the millions of women worldwide with oestrogen receptor positive breast cancer. Australian scientists have shown that a specific change, which occurs when tumours become resistant to anti-oestrogen therapy, might make the cancers susceptible to treatment with chemotherapy drugs. Seventy percent of breast cancer patients have oestrogen receptor positive cancer, and most …

Doctors bail out on their practices

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

Doctors who own private practices are looking for a way out. Fed up with their rising business expenses and shrinking payouts from insurers, many are selling their practices to hospitals. It’s happening nationwide and has picked up pace, said Tony Stajduhar, president at Jackson & Coker, a physician recruitment firm. Experts say the number of physicians unloading their practices to …

Proteomics can improve breast cancer treatmen

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From medicalxpress.com Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have identified a protein that could help physicians decide what type of therapy patients with hormone driven breast cancer should go through. In a study, published in Nature Communications, they show that high levels of a protein called retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARA) in breast tumors can be linked to an insufficient …

What is the biggest mistake patients make?

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From KevinMD.com By Alex Lickerman, MD The biggest mistake patients make isn’t what you think. It isn’t turning down tests or treatments their doctors recommend. Nor is it deciding not to take the medicines their doctors prescribe. It isn’t insisting on getting a test or beginning a treatment their doctors recommend against, either, and it isn’t failing to exercise, stay …

3 secrets my doctor doesn’t know

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

Dear Doctor, I am a good patient. I’m organized, I know my health history and I’m particularly polite. I’ll thank you just for giving me bad news. I look up to you. I do see myself as a partner in my care, but I depend on your expertise. I appreciate the years of schooling and sleepless residency nights that have …

Too Little Vitamin D May Hasten Disability as You Age

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From  Drugs.com Older people with vitamin D deficiency may struggle with daily physical activities such as dressing or climbing stairs, a new study shows. It’s estimated that as many as 90 percent of older people are vitamin D-deficient. The vitamin, usually absorbed through sunlight or diet, plays a key role in bone and muscle health, and a deficiency can lead …

A non pharma way to treat ADHD uses computer gaming, physical activity

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From MedCity News by Stephanie Baum A Yale neuroscientist and psychiatry professor has developed an enrichment program that could help children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder stay on task and avoid getting distracted. C8 Sciences has raised the first part of a $1.1 million fundraise in a move the CEO hopes will help it advance product development and build its …

Experimental ‘iKnife’ Tells Surgeon Whether Tissue Is Cancerous

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From Drugs.com An experimental surgical “knife” can accurately identify cancerous tissue as a surgeon cuts through it, creating the potential for shorter cancer surgeries that remove all traces of tumor, according to a study co-written by the device’s developers. The “iKnife” uses electricity to cauterize surgical incisions as they are made, and then samples the resulting smoke to determine whether …

Aspirin Every Other Day May Lower Women’s Colon Cancer Risk

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From Drugs.com Taking a low-dose aspirin every other day may reduce the risk of colorectal cancer, according to a study that focused on nearly 40,000 women aged 45 and older. The protection does seem to take some time to surface, said researcher Nancy Cook, a professor of medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School. “After 10 years, …