View Post

Could a Pill Help Detect Breast Cancer?

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Emily Matchar From: smithsonian.com Women eventually face the yearly ritual of the mammogram, usually suggested from age 50 onwards. It’s not painful, though notoriously uncomfortable, as two plates flatten the breasts, pancake-like, to get the best possible picture. The radiologist then looks at x-ray images for opaque spots that can indicate tumors. Mammography has been used since the late 1960s and is …

View Post

Diagnosing, treating neuropathy symptoms in cancer patients not exact science

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From: University of Michigan Most of the roughly 15.5 million cancer survivors in the U.S. receive chemotherapy, and roughly 65 percent develop some degree of the chemotherapy-induced nerve damage known as peripheral neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy simply means nerves outside of the brain and spinal cord are affected, and symptoms include numbness and tingling in extremities, and in about 30 percent …

View Post

Women with multiple violent partners more likely to have endured childhood trauma, psychological abuse

In Domestic Abuse Posts By Barbara by Barbara Jacoby

ANN ARBOR—While there is abundant research on violently abusive relationships, it does not delve into the background of each individual involved, according to University of Michigan researchers. A new U-M study found that some factors, such as a history of childhood sexual abuse, having been held hostage, tortured or being in a current relationship that involves psychological abuse are all …

View Post

Balancing Work and Breast Cancer

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Sarah Goodell, Manager of Programs, Cancer and Careers From: [email protected] A breast cancer diagnosis leads to many uncertainties; survivors often talk about the list of questions that run through their minds in the moments after learning of a diagnosis: “Will I live? What will treatment entail? How much will it cost? Can I keep working?”. This last question is …

View Post

New study explains how very aggressive cancer cells use energy to divide, move

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

Source: University of Michigan Health System From: sciencedaily.com Cancer cells and normal cells both divide and move, but with cancer cells it’s like they’re on steroids: everything is bigger, faster, more. A new study explains how cancer cells use energy to fuel this switch between motion and proliferation. The researchers identified for the first time a connection between a cancer …

View Post

University researchers reveal key protein structure for cancer spread

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Irene Park From: michigandaily.com A University of Michigan research team led by John Tesmer, professor of pharmacology and biological chemistry, published a study earlier this month on a structure of a protein that might be important for preventing the spread of cancer throughout the body. Metastasis is the spread of the primary cancer from its original location to other parts of …