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PET scan tracer predicts success of cancer ‘vaccine’

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: HANAE ARMITAGE From: stanford.edu With a radioactive tracer, scientists can use a PET scan to quickly tell whether a cancer immunotherapy will be effective or not, according to a new Stanford study. By engineering a special molecule to track certain immune cells in the body, scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine have invented a litmus test for the effectiveness of a …

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Multigene testing replacing BRCA tests for breast cancer risk

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: KRISTA CONGER From: stanford.edu Tests to detect mutations in multiple genes are replacing BRCA-only analyses in women with breast cancer, according to a study by scientists at Stanford and several other institutions. Greater access to genetic counselors needed. The use of genetic tests aimed at detecting the presence of mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in women with breast cancer …

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Workaround erases side effects of promising cell-based cancer therapy

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Bruce Goldman Source: Stanford Medicine News Center Stanford scientists created an odd couple: a modified version of an immune-signaling protein and a coordinately modified receptor for this protein. The two bind only to each other, easing an advanced anti-cancer therapy’s side effects. Altering a powerful immune-signaling chemical plus its receptor on immune cells may bring a promising cancer treatment …

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Have scientists found an anti-cancer vaccine?

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Ana Sandoiu From: medicalnewstoday.com Researchers from Stanford University used stem cells to create a vaccine that has proven effective against breast, lung, and skin cancer in mice. To produce the vaccine, the scientists turned to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), or stem cells that are generated from adult cells. Over a decade ago, Japanese-based scientists showed for the first …

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Nearly half of breast cancer patients have severe treatment side effects

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Lisa Rapaport From: reuters.com Many women being treated for breast cancer suffer from severe treatment side effects even when they don’t receive chemotherapy, a recent study suggests. For the study, researchers surveyed 1,945 women diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer about the severity of seven treatment side effects: nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, pain, arm swelling, shortness of breath and …

Stanford licenses promising cancer drug to local biotech startup

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Stephanie M. Lee From: sfgate.com Most cancer patients don’t die because of a single tumor, but rather multiple tumors that spread throughout the body. A new therapy, developed by Stanford University researchers and licensed by a local biotech startup, appears to disrupt the deadly process known as metastasis, which causes cancer cells to break away from the original tumor sites …

Stanford researchers create ‘evolved’ protein that may stop cancer from spreading

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Tom Abate From: stanford.edu A team of Stanford researchers has developed a protein therapy that disrupts the process that causes cancer cells to break away from original tumor sites, travel through the bloodstream and start aggressive new growths elsewhere in the body. This process, known as metastasis, can cause cancer to spread with deadly effect. “The majority of patients …

OB/Gyn FDA Panel: Roche’s DNA Test Can Replace Pap Smear

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By Joyce Frieden, News Editor, MedPage Today An FDA advisory committee voted unanimously Wednesday to recommend that the Pap smear be replaced with a human papillomavirus (HPV) test as the first-line standard of care for cancer screening. The FDA’s Medical Devices Advisory Committee Microbiology Panel agreed by a vote of 13-0 in each of three successive votes that the cobas viral …