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In surprising reversal, scientists find a cellular process that stops cancer before it starts

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

Source: Salk Institute for Biological Studies From: prnewswire.com Salk research shows that cellular recycling process, thought to fuel cancer’s growth, can actually prevent it Just as plastic tips protect the ends of shoelaces and keep them from fraying when we tie them, molecular tips called telomeres protect the ends of chromosomes and keep them from fusing when cells continually divide …

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Maintaining the unlimited potential of stem cells

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

Source: Salk Institute for Biological Studies Salk scientists discover new protein complex that keeps embryonic stem cells at stage of fullest potential, a key to regenerative medicine Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are the very definition of being full of potential, given that they can become any type of cell in the body. Once they start down any particular path toward …

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Decoding the structure of an RNA-based CRISPR system

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

Salk Institute researchers uncover molecular details of a new genetic engineering tool Over the past several years, CRISPR-Cas9 has moved beyond the lab bench and into the public zeitgeist. This gene-editing tool holds promise for correcting defects inside individual cells and potentially healing or preventing many human ailments. But the Cas9 system alters DNA, not RNA, and some experts believe …

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Tweaking cells’ gatekeepers could lead to new way to fight cancer

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

Salk scientists develop method to manipulate numbers of nuclear pores If the cell nucleus is like a bank for DNA, nuclear pores are the security doors around its perimeter. Yet more security doors aren’t necessarily better: some cancer cells contain a dramatic excess of nuclear pores. Salk Institute researchers reported on September 18, 2018, in the journal Genes & Development …

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New method of pinpointing cancer mutations could lead to more targeted treatments

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

Salk Institute researchers and collaborators develop approach to yield more complete picture of cancer Cancer cells often have mutations in their DNA that can give scientists clues about how the cancer started or which treatment may be most effective. Finding these mutations can be difficult, but a new method may offer more complete, comprehensive results. A team of researchers has …

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A master switch controls aggressive breast cancer

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

Salk scientists who discovered that aggressive breast cancer reprises pathways found in fetal cells have identified genetic master switch for process A team at the Salk Institute has identified a master switch that appears to control the dynamic behavior of tumor cells that makes some aggressive cancers so difficult to treat. The gene Sox10 directly controls the growth and invasion …

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Back to the future: breast cancer reprises pathways found in fetal cells

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

Salk scientists identify genetic characteristics of fetal stem cells that may lead to breast cancer later in life Using just a microscope, Italian surgeon Francesco Durante was struck by the similarities between cells in the most malignant cancers and the embryonic cells of the organ in which the cancer originated. More than a century later, scientists at the Salk Institute …

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The right way to repair DNA

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From: Salk Institute for Biological Studies Salk scientists discover that a microprotein helps cells choose best path to repair genes and avoid cancer Is it better to do a task quickly and make mistakes, or to do it slowly but perfectly? When it comes to deciding how to fix breaks in DNA, cells face the same choice between two major …

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MicroRNA helps cancer evade immune system

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

Salk researchers discover how oxygen-deprived tumors survive body’s immune response The immune system automatically destroys dysfunctional cells such as cancer cells, but cancerous tumors often survive nonetheless. A new study by Salk scientists shows one method by which fast-growing tumors evade anti-tumor immunity. The Salk team uncovered two gene-regulating molecules that alter cell signaling within tumor cells to survive and …

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Molecular “brake” stifles human lung cancer

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From: Salk Institute for Biological Studies By testing over 4,000 genes in human tumors, a Salk team uncovered an enzyme responsible for suppressing a common and deadly lung cancer Scientists at the Salk Institute have uncovered a molecule whose mutation leads to the aggressive growth of a common and deadly type of lung cancer in humans. This enzyme, called EphA2, …