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Triple negative breast cancers can adopt reversible state that is resistant to chemotherapy

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

Source: University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center From: eurekalert.org Study finds that resistant cells become vulnerable to MD Anderson-developed targeted therapy Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have discovered that triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells can develop resistance to frontline, or neoadjuvant, chemotherapy not by acquiring permanent adaptations, but rather transiently turning on …

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How chronic stress boosts cancer cell growth

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Maria Cohut From: medicalnewstoday.com Having conducted a new study in mice, researchers now have a much better understanding of how chronic (long-term, sustained) stress can accelerate the growth of cancer stem cells. They may also have found a way to prevent stress from doing its damage. Chronic stress, which a person has consistently over a long period of time, …

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New Study Shows a Decline in the Incidence of Recurrent Metastatic Breast Cancer Over Time but no Improvement in Survival

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From: prnewswire.com A retrospective analysis –  reported in the journal Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, by Judith Malmgren, PhD, and co-authors – studied 8292 women with stage I-III invasive breast cancer, 964 of whom (11.6%) were later diagnosed with recurrent metastatic breast cancer (rMBC). The authors found a significant decline in rMBC over time, but no increase in survival. Survival …

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New study suggests loosening strict comorbidity criteria would open trials to thousands of previously exempt patients

In Clinical Trials by Barbara Jacoby

By: Diane Mapes From: fredhutch.org How do you make cancer clinical trials available to more patients? A new study published today in JAMA Oncology and led by Dr. Joseph Unger at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center offers a tantalizing solution: loosen up the strict eligibility criteria. Low clinical trial participation is a problem that’s plagued cancer researchers for decades, with …

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How cancer could be treated with an old alcoholism drug

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Ana Sandoiu From: medicalnewstoday.com Previous studies have demonstrated that the alcohol abuse drug disulfiram has anticancer properties. But until now, researchers had not found the mechanism by which the drug can target cancer. New research sheds light, paving the way for the repurposing of the drug. A new study — published in the journal Nature — uncovers the mechanism …

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Killing cancer softly: New approach halts tumor growth

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Ana Sandoiu From: medicalnewstoday.com One of the reasons that cancer is so hard to beat is the way that it ropes our immune system into working against us. Treatment kills off some cancer cells, but what’s left behind can “trick” our immune system into helping tumors to form. New research may have found a way to break this vicious …

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Cancer Patients Turning up in Emergency Departments with Delirium Likely to Die Earlier

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From: Wiley Research News via prnewswire.com According to a new study published in The Oncologist, patients with advanced cancer who are diagnosed with delirium when turning up in emergency departments are more likely to be admitted to hospital and more likely to die earlier than patients without delirium. This shows the importance of accurately diagnosing delirium in advanced cancer patients, …

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Risk of developing cancer from the ‘Angelina Jolie gene’ depends entirely on family history, major study finds

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Stephen Matthews From: dailymail.co.uk The exact risk of developing cancer from having the ‘Angelina Jolie gene’ depends on family history, major new analysis shows. BRCA mutations, made famous by the Hollywood actress who was a carrier, are known to heighten the chance of developing the deadly disease. But before now, scientists were unable to provide an accurate percentage for …

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Link between air pollution and breast cancer discovered

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From: figo.org (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) Women living in areas that experience high levels of pollution could be at a higher risk of breast cancer, according to a new study. Research has suggested that increased exposure to soot particles could lead to denser breast tissue, which is one of the strongest risk factors linked to breast cancer. Those …

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SECOND CANCERS DEADLIER IN YOUNG PATIENTS

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

Second cancers in children and adolescents and young adults (AYA) are far deadlier than they are in older adults and may partially account for the relatively poor outcomes of cancer patients ages 15-39 overall, a new study by UC Davis researchers has found. The study also found that survival after almost all types of cancer is much higher when the …