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How cells actively stop breast cancer from becoming invasive

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Ana Sandoiu From: medicalnewstoday.com A new study shows that the cells surrounding the breast’s milk ducts form an active barrier that extends and grabs cancer cells before they spread to the rest of the body. The American Cancer Society estimate that in 2017, there were over 310,000 new cases of breast cancer among American women. Of these, 63,410 women …

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Bowel cancer: Low-calorie soft drinks could reduce recurrence

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By:  Catharine Paddock PhD From: medicalnewstoday.com Consuming artificially sweetened soft drinks such as diet colas may be linked to a significantly lower risk of cancer return or death in patients with stage 3 colorectal cancer. It is also likely that around half the effect is due to artificially sweetened options displacing sugar-sweetened ones. These were the conclusions of a study, which has …

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Targeting the enzyme with a dual role in breast and brain health

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

LBy: Maria Cohut From: medicalnewstoday.com The enzyme tousled-like kinase 2 maintains genome stability at cellular level. Researchers have also linked it to different health conditions, including breast cancer and intellectual disability. A new study now describes this enzyme’s structure, arguing that this will help to design better therapies. Tousled-like kinases are enzymes that play a complex role in preserving genome stability within …

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Using cell metabolism to battle cancer

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Tim Newman From: medicalnewstoday.com By focusing on how cancer stem cells metabolize, researchers may have uncovered a new way to defeat them: by attacking their energy supply. Drug resistance is a sizable problem for cancer treatment. Medications that might initially work will soon become ineffective. Scientists from the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center in Ann Arbor are focusing on how cancer stem …

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Is it possible to kill cancer by ‘overfeeding’ it?

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Maria Cohut From: medicalnewstoday.com Oxidative stress is a phenomenon that occurs at a cellular level, and which can drive previously healthy cells to deteriorate and eventually die. Cancer often uses oxidative stress to its own benefit, but could this phenomenon be turned against it? Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are substances that are produced naturally following the process of oxygen metabolism. …

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How could designer proteins thwart cancer?

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Maria Cohut From: medicalnewstoday.com Chromosomes, or DNA molecules found in cells carrying genetic material, are “bookended” by telomeres, which will prevent them from “unraveling.” Telomeres are also important in the growth and aging process of cells, but what happens when cancer “hijacks” them, and can this be prevented? “A normal cell grows for just the right amount of time that …

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Is there a link between breast-feeding and breast cancer?

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Nicole Galan From: medicalnewstoday.com Women who are breast-feeding are often acutely aware of how their breasts feel so they will usually notice any physical changes. It is common to find breast lumps during lactation, which can lead women to worry about breast cancer. Women who know they have breast cancer are likely to have concerns about the safety of breast-feeding and …

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Lung cancer destroyed with tea leaf nanoparticles

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Ana Sandoiu From: medicalnewstoday.com A new study has shown that lung cancer cells can be destroyed using nanoparticles derived from tea leaves. These tiny particles, called “quantum dots,” are 400 times thinner than a human hair, and producing them from tea leaves is safe and non-toxic. More and more research has been focusing on the potential uses of nanoparticles for …

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Deadly brain cancer stopped with new compound

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By; Ana Sandoiu From: medicalnewstoday.com Glioblastoma, one of the deadliest forms of brain cancer, may have found its nemesis. New research shows that the tumor, which is notoriously difficult to treat, can be halted by an experimental compound. Glioblastoma is a particularly aggressive form of brain tumor, with a median survival rate of 10–12 months. Part of the reason why glioblastomas are so deadly is that …