Long-term cancer survivor celebrates remission

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

Submitted by Lakin Green, public relations intern for Banner Health From: azcentral.com Carolene Davis, 52, has been forced to stay on her toes when it comes to her health. Not once or twice, but seven times she had to face the words: You have cancer. After 16 years of struggle, Davis’ cancer has gone into remission. Talk about a reason …

Lung Cancer Not on Many Women’s Radar: Survey

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By Amy Norton From: wedMD.com U.S. women still see breast cancer as a bigger killer than lung cancer, despite the fact that lung cancer kills more Americans each year — women and men — than any other cancer. That’s one of the findings from a new American Lung Association (ALA) survey of over 1,000 adult U.S. women. The poll also …

Drug combo may knock down lung cancer

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By Bradley J. Fikes Some drug-resistant cancers of the lung, pancreas and breast might be made vulnerable again by treating them with a medication already approved for another type of cancer, according to a new study led by scientists at UC San Diego. Researchers at UCSD Moores Cancer Center said they plan to start a clinical trial to test the …

Simple Blood Test To Spot Early Lung Cancer Getting Closer

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Richard Harris From: npr.org One of these days, there could well be a simple blood test that can help diagnose and track cancers. We aren’t there yet, but a burst of research in this area shows we are getting a lot closer. In the latest of these studies, scientists have used blood samples to identify people with lung cancer. …

Could Antioxidants Speed Up Cancer Progression?

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From: Drug.com Smokers and other people at high risk for lung cancer could make matters worse if they take antioxidant supplements, a new study of rodents suggests. Antioxidants appear to accelerate cancer progression by short-circuiting one of the body’s key immune responses to malignant cells, researchers from Sweden report. Normal doses of vitamin E and smaller doses of the antioxidant …

Many Lung Cancer Tumors May Prove Harmless, Study Finds

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From: Drugs.com Smokers who have a CT scan to check for lung cancer stand a nearly one-in-five chance that doctors will find and potentially treat a tumor that would not have caused illness or death, researchers report. Despite the finding, major medical groups indicated they are likely to stick by current recommendations that a select segment of long-time smokers undergo …

Gene Testing May Boost Lung Cancer Survival: Study

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From: Drugs.com Chances of surviving lung cancer longer increase when treatment is personalized based on the genetics of the cancer, German researchers report. Knowing the tumor’s genetic signature can help doctors spot differences in cancer cells that may lead to a more accurate diagnosis and better-targeted therapy, the researchers explained. “Gene classification and diagnosis has a profound impact on patients’ …

Could Antidepressant Combat Lethal Lung Cancer?

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

As posted on Drugs.com An older and little-used class of antidepressants may help combat a particularly deadly form of lung cancer, according to a new study. Using a unique computer program, researchers from the Stanford University School of Medicine identified tricyclic antidepressants as a potential treatment for small cell lung cancer. This class of drugs was introduced decades ago and …

Discovery May Help Pinpoint Risk of Lung Cancer Returning After Surgery

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From Drugs.com Certain characteristics of tumors in lung cancer patients are associated with a strong risk of cancer recurrence after surgery, according to a new study. The researchers said these findings could help identify patients who will benefit from more extensive lung surgery, potentially reducing the risk of lung cancer recurrence by 75 percent. It could also help identify patients …

U.S. Panel Backs Routine Lung CT Scans for Older, Heavy Smokers

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From Drugs.com A highly influential government panel of experts is recommending that older smokers at high risk of lung cancer receive annual low-dose CT scans to help detect and possibly prevent the spread of the fatal disease. The The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) concluded that the benefits to a very specific segment of smokers outweigh the risks involved …