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Weight-loss drug could fight resistant lung cancer

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

Posted by National University of Singapore From: futurity.org New research could pave the way for using versions of an existing drug to keep lung cancer cells from becoming drug-resistant. Researchers have discovered that a key enzyme in lipid metabolism controls the response to a class of targeted drugs called tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in lung cancer. Cells use nutrients such …

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Lung cancer risk drops substantially within five years of quitting, new research finds

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

Source: Vanderbilt University Medical Center From: sciencenewsdaily.com Just because you stopped smoking years ago doesn’t mean you’re out of the woods when it comes to developing lung cancer. That’s the “bad” news. The good news is your risk of lung cancer drops substantially within five years of quitting.i These are the main findings of a new analysis of the landmark …

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Lung cancer destroyed with tea leaf nanoparticles

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Ana Sandoiu From: medicalnewstoday.com A new study has shown that lung cancer cells can be destroyed using nanoparticles derived from tea leaves. These tiny particles, called “quantum dots,” are 400 times thinner than a human hair, and producing them from tea leaves is safe and non-toxic. More and more research has been focusing on the potential uses of nanoparticles for …

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Keytruda Performs Well in Latest Lung Cancer Clinical Trials

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From: healthline.com The immunotherapy drug has been successful in treating other cancers and the latest trials provide hope for people battling lung cancer. When Edith Pelka was diagnosed with advanced non-small cell lung cancer last summer, the retired New York nurse, yoga instructor, and self-described “straight shooter” thought her life was over. “After the surgeon told me that my tumor …

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Immunotherapy transforms lung cancer, the biggest cancer killer

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Maggie Fox From: nbcnews.com Immune therapy drugs can transform lung cancer treatment, giving patients years of extra life, doctors reported Monday. They found that pre-treating lung cancer patients with immune therapy drugs before they have surgery can help melt away the tumor and at the same time limit or even stop its spread. And combinations of immunotherapy drugs have helped …

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New drug attacks cancer-causing genes

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Tim Newman From: medicalnewstoday.com Two recent papers attack two cancer-related problems using the same drug. They hope that it might improve survival in breast and lung cancer and halt obesity-related cancers. Researchers from Michigan State University in East Lansing are using novel molecular routes to attack cancer. The scientists were particularly interested in bromodomain inhibitors (BET inhibitors). These are …

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Promising drug may stop cancer-causing gene in its tracks

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

Source: Michigan State University From: sciencedaily.com Michigan State University scientists are testing a promising drug that may stop a gene associated with obesity from triggering breast and lung cancer, as well as prevent these cancers from growing. These findings are based on two studies featured in the latest issue of Cancer Prevention Research. The first was a preclinical study, led …

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Lung cancer tumor growth halved with new approach

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Maria Cohut From: medicalnewstoday.com New research from Sweden has taken strides toward finding a cure for lung cancer. It focused on noncoding molecules that have been puzzling scientists for a long time. According to the National Cancer Institute (NCI), lung cancer caused around 25.9 percent of all cancer-related deaths last year and accounted for 13.2 percent of all new …

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Have scientists found an anti-cancer vaccine?

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Ana Sandoiu From: medicalnewstoday.com Researchers from Stanford University used stem cells to create a vaccine that has proven effective against breast, lung, and skin cancer in mice. To produce the vaccine, the scientists turned to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), or stem cells that are generated from adult cells. Over a decade ago, Japanese-based scientists showed for the first …