View Post

PET scans show biomarkers could spare some breast cancer patients from chemotherapy

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine From: sciencedaily.com In an effort to further individualize therapy and avoid over-treating patients, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center report a new study using PET scans has identified a biomarker that may accurately predict which patients with one type of HER2-positive breast cancer might best benefit from standalone HER2-targeted agents, without the need for …

View Post

High costs of breast cancer-associated lymphedema can ‘cripple’ patients financially

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From: healio.com Individuals with breast cancer continue to face high health care costs years after a diagnosis, according to study findings published in Journal of Supportive Care and Cancer. The problem is particularly apparent among those with breast cancer-associated lymphedema. Results showed annual out-of-pocket costs of $2,306 for those with lymphedema vs. $1,090 for those without lymphedema — a 112% …

View Post

A new toolkit for studying how ‘PARP’ activity boosts cancers

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

Source: Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health From: sciencedaily.com A new method is likely to speed the study of an important biological process called ADP-ribosylation — a process driven by PARP enzymes that helps some cancers grow and is suspected to be a factor in other common diseases.  ADP-ribosylation occurs at high levels in some cancers, and drugs …

View Post

Osteoporosis risk rises sharply even for younger breast cancer survivors

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

Source: Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health From: medicalxpress.com Women diagnosed with breast cancer who are 50 or younger face a much higher risk of the bone-loss condition osteoporosis compared to women of the same age who do not have cancer. The findings, which complement prior research showing higher bone-loss risk in older breast cancer survivors, come from …

View Post

Johns Hopkins researchers develop new, highly accurate urine test to predict risk for cervical cancer

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

Source: John Hopkins Medicine From: news-medical.net Johns Hopkins Medicine specialists report they have developed a urine test for the likely emergence of cervical cancer that is highly accurate compared to other tests based on genetic markers derived directly from cervical tissue. The new urine test, they say, is different because it analyzes not only multiple sources of human cellular DNA …