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Men with Genetic Mutations: What You Need to Know

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Kristie L. Kahl From: curetoday.com Cancer risk and management of men with genetic mutations is not focused on nearly enough, according to Rachel Shapira, Sc.M., LCGC. “Part of the problem is it is really easy to get caught up thinking about all of the risks for women because there is a lot we have to think about … but …

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Research raises hope for colon cancer prevention drug

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Marie McCullough From: philly.com Most experts say colon cancer is a multistage disease driven by the accumulation of genetic mutations. Not Scott A. Waldman. The Thomas Jefferson University researcher has spent decades bolstering the iconoclastic idea that colon cancer is basically a hormone-deficiency disease – one that can be reversed or even prevented by restoring the hormone. Now, Waldman’s …

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New therapies offer hope to cancer patients

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Hudson Sangree From: sacbee.com Gale Kilgore, a retired medical librarian in Amador County, went to the doctor two years ago for what she suspected was a urinary tract infection. She learned she had bladder cancer. Doctors at Sutter Amador Hospital removed the tumor from her bladder, only to discover the cancer had spread to surrounding muscle. A subsequent round …

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Personalized Cancer Treatment, Driven by a Blood Filter the Size of a Credit Card

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Christina Galbraith From: newsweek.com We were wrong about cancer. Calling an illness “prostate cancer” or “breast cancer” doesn’t get to the core of the problem. That classification system—using organs and parts of bodies—is far too broad. Even categorizing cancers based on a specific cell type within an organ, bone or muscle, such as the lining of the kidney, isn’t …

Breast cancer survivors have double mastectomies they do not need

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

Young women breast cancer survivors are having their remaining healthy breast needlessly removed because they over-estimate the chance that disease will return, a study has found. By Laura Donnelly, and agencies Research on more than 120 women who had a double mastectomy found that they believed the risks that cancer would return were twice as high as they were. The …