Promising new drugs, research “dream teams,” cancer risk findings; news … The Plain Dealer

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By Angela Townsend From: cleveland.com Wednesday marks the official end of the four-day annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research in San Diego, at which more than 18,400 scientists, physicians, patient advocates and other professionals in the field of oncology convened. Among the research creating some of the biggest buzz: promising results of two drugs shown to slow …

Sidestepping the Biopsy With New Tools to Spot Cancer

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Andrew Pollack From: nytimes.com For people with cancer or suspected cancer, the biopsy is a necessary evil — an uncomfortable and somewhat risky procedure to extract tissue for diagnosis or analysis. Lynn Lewis, a breast cancer patient in Brooklyn, has had her cancer analyzed an easier way: simple blood tests that are being called “liquid biopsies.” Telltale traces of …

Doctors Say Second Most Deadly Cancer is Preventable

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

The month of March has been proclaimed as Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, and doctors are taking the time to speak out about preventative measures. Colon cancer is the number two cause of cancer-related deaths in both the country and the state, but doctors say it doesn’t have to be deadly at all. “Colon cancer is actually preventable so screening is …

Girl, 9, barred from school for shaving head to support friend with cancer – Fox News

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

Tim Kenny knew the charity he helped establish to fight childhood cancer wasn’t done raising money, but he thought St. Baldrick’s Foundation had pretty much buried the stigma of baldness that young fighters of the disease once bore. Then, he heard about Kamryn Renfro. The 9-year-old Grand Junction, Colo., girl shaved her head to show solidarity for her pal, Delaney …

Ultrasound microscope identifies cancerous tissue by acoustic profile

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From: MTB Europe Professor Naohiro Hozumi of Toyohashi University of Technology has developed an ultrasonic microscope to differentiate living tissue and cell specimens for medical purposes. Ultrasonic microscopes have a wide range of applications including determining the presence of otherwise invisible defects in components used in the automobile, aeronautical, and construction industries. For medical applications it has advantages over an …

U.S. Cancer Deaths Decline Again: Report

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From: Drugs.com The rate of cancer deaths among Americans continues to decline, according to a new report. Over the last 20 years, the overall risk of dying from cancer has dropped 20 percent, researchers found. The fastest decline in cancer death risk has been among middle-aged black men, for whom death rates have dropped by about 50 percent, the study …

Vitamin D Supplements Won’t Help Prevent Disease: Review

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From: Drugs.com Low levels of vitamin D have been implicated as a potential cause of diseases ranging from cancer to diabetes. Now an extensive review suggests it’s really the other way around: Low levels of the “sunshine vitamin” are more likely a consequence — not a cause — of illness. In their review of almost 500 studies, the researchers found …

The importance of sex in the midst of a cancer diagnosis

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

by James C. Salwitz, MD From: KevinMD.com It occurs to me that I talk to my patients more about death and dying, than about sex.  It is not that I lack interest or an appreciation of the importance of intimacy, but like most physicians I fall into the trap of fighting the dread disease, instead of focusing on the wonders …

No Good Data For or Against Taking Vitamins, Experts Say

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From: Drugs.com Even though millions of Americans pop a vitamin, mineral or multivitamin supplement every day, an influential government-appointed panel of experts says the jury is still out on whether they help boost health or not. In its draft guidelines, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force said that in some cases, certain supplements, such as beta carotene or vitamin E, …