This breast cancer scares patients, challenges doctors

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Shari Rudavsky From: indystar.com When Tonya Trotter first felt a quarter-size knot in her breast, she didn’t rush to get a mammogram. Over the next few months, the lump grew to the size of a tennis ball. But it was the sharp pain in her breast that finally persuaded her to go to the emergency room in August 2012. …

Nanoparticles cause cancer cells to self-destruct

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

Using magnetically controlled nanoparticles to force tumour cells to ‘self-destruct’ sounds like science fiction, but could be a future part of cancer treatment, according to research from Lund University in Sweden. “The clever thing about the technique is that we can target selected cells without harming surrounding tissue. There are many ways to kill cells, but this method is contained …

Experts Question Routine Mammograms in Elderly

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

UCSF-Harvard Study Finds Tests Offer Limited Benefit to Oldest Female Patients Doctors should focus on life expectancy when deciding whether to order mammograms for their oldest female patients, since the harms of screening likely outweigh the benefits unless women are expected to live at least another decade, according to a review of the scientific literature by experts at UCSF and …

Tobacco plant may light the way to beating cancer, Australian scientists say

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From: theguardian.com Ornamental varieties of plant contain molecule that specifically targets cancer cells, say researchers The tobacco plant could be a powerful weapon in the fight against cancer, say Australian scientists. They have found a molecule in the flower of the plant that targets cancer cells and rips them open, according to an article in the journal eLife. “There is …

Sidestepping the Biopsy With New Tools to Spot Cancer

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By: Andrew Pollack From: nytimes.com For people with cancer or suspected cancer, the biopsy is a necessary evil — an uncomfortable and somewhat risky procedure to extract tissue for diagnosis or analysis. Lynn Lewis, a breast cancer patient in Brooklyn, has had her cancer analyzed an easier way: simple blood tests that are being called “liquid biopsies.” Telltale traces of …

Pfizer drug doubles time to breast cancer tumor growth in trial

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From: reuters.com Pfizer Inc’s experimental breast cancer drug in a clinical trial nearly doubled the amount of time patients lived without their disease getting worse, but overall survival was not yet shown to be statistically significant, researchers said. The Phase 2 study, which involved women with the most common form of breast cancer, found that those treated with hormone drug …

Many Breast Cancer Survivors Suffer Financially, Study Finds

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From: philly.com One-quarter of breast cancer survivors are worse off financially four years after their diagnosis, and 12 percent still have medical debt from their cancer therapy, a new study finds. “As oncologists, we are proud of the advances in our ability to cure an increasing proportion of patients diagnosed with breast cancer,” study author Dr. Reshma Jagsi, an associate …

Dartmouth doctors, engineers find breast cancer surgery breakthrough

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By MEGHAN PIERCE Union Leader Correspondent A new technique of combining MRI and optical scanning can accurately locate small breast cancer tumors during surgery, according to new findings from physicians at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Norris Cotton Cancer Center and engineers from Dartmouth College’s Thayer School of Engineering. Together the physicians and engineers developed a new approach to breast-conserving surgery that simplifies …

Faster Genetic Testing Method Will Likely Transform Care for Many Patients With Breast Cancer

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From: Wiley Science Newsroom Faster and cheaper DNA sequencing techniques will likely improve care for patients with breast cancer but also create challenges for clinicians as they counsel patients on their treatment options. Those are among the conclusions of a study published recently in the BJS (British Journal of Surgery). The findings provide insights into how genetic advances will soon …

Triple negative breast cancer’s progression and relapse pinned to a gene

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

Scientists from Houston Methodist and Weill Cornell Medical College have found that a gene previously unassociated with breast cancer plays a pivotal role in the growth and progression of the triple negative form of the disease, a particularly deadly strain that often has few treatment options. Their research, published in the April 3 Nature (online today), suggests that targeting the …