Older breast cancer patients choosing lumpectomies

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From: San Francisco Chronicle About 1 in 8 American women will be diagnosed with breast cancer at some point in her life, and those who’ve already been diagnosed know there are many decisions to make. Although every case is different, studies show new breast cancer treatment trends are emerging. For one thing, in the Bay Area, women with early-stage breast cancer …

200,000 Heart Disease, Stroke Deaths Could Be Prevented: CDC

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From: Drugs.com In 2010, more than 200,000 Americans under 75 died from heart disease and stroke that could have been prevented, health officials said Tuesday. Sadly, more than half of those who died were under 65, according to a new report released by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “As a doctor, I find it heartbreaking to know …

Nurse Retention and Recruitment News: Veterans Can Help End Nursing Shortage

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP Military medics and other veterans with healthcare experience or training can pursue nursing careers. The U.S Department of Health and Human Services has announced a new program to help veterans earn BSNs by “building on their unique skills and abilities,” according to an HHS news release. Administered by the Health Resources and Services Administration, an …

Glass of Wine a Day May Ward Off Depression, Study Suggests

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From: Drugs.com In the same way that a little wine may be good for the heart, it might also help avoid depression, a Spanish study suggests. So while drinking a lot of wine or other alcohol may be a sign of depression or other mental health problems, alcohol in moderation may benefit mental health, the study authors contend. “One drink …

Understanding Cancer Risk: The Paradox of Modern Health

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

by: Dr. Barry Boyd It is important to understand risk and why Americans have a particular difficulty with the issue of cancer risk. This, in part, reflects a unique American belief that we can have control of all aspects of our lives. As a result, any adverse event may be linked to something “we did or potentially could have avoided.” …

Breast Cancer Survivors Battling Brittle Bones

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

Breast cancer survivors not benefitting from calcium and vitamin D supplementations (dailyRx News) Breast cancer survivors can have ongoing health challenges after they’ve beaten “The Big C.” Many are on medications that block estrogen, the hormone that drives most breast cancers. These medicines also increase the risk of osteoporosis (brittle bones) and increase the risk of fractures.   A new …

Blood Cancer Drug Decitabine May Prevent Breast Cancer Metastasis

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From: By Pam Stephan, About.com Breast tumors can shed cells, but if Decitabine, a drug now used to treat lymphoma and leukemia, is approved for use in breast cancer, it could prevent the metastasis of most forms of this disease. Dr. Peter Storz, of the Mayo Clinic, led a research study that concluded that protein kinase D (PKD) expression in …

Stress: A Cause Of Breast Cancer?

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

By Peter Zafirides, M.D. Ohio State University researchers say the study suggests a specific gene, called ATF3, may be the crucial link between stress and cancer, including metastasis – the major cause of cancer death. Previous public health studies have shown that stress is a risk factor for cancer. Researchers already know that ATF3 is activated, or expressed, in response …

New therapy strategy for breast cancer that has spread to the brain

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

Kathy Boltz, PhD Cellular therapy and gene therapy have been successfully combined in a mouse model to develop a viable treatment strategy for breast cancer that has spread to a patient’s brain. Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer in women, and metastasis is a major cause of health deterioration and death from the disease. Managing metastasis is …

Far from being harmless, the effects of bullying last long into adulthood

In In The News by Barbara Jacoby

From: Association for Psychological Science A new study shows that serious illness, struggling to hold down a regular job, and poor social relationships are just some of the adverse outcomes in adulthood faced by those exposed to bullying in childhood. It has long been acknowledged that bullying at a young age presents a problem for schools, parents and public policy …